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taliban led injure genesee. but the war is far from over. jennifer griffin with the news tonight live from the pentagon. general, david petraeus is leaving as the taliban targets the afghan's president's inner circle, i guess. >> that's right. general petraeus is now on route back to the u.s. he transition the with marine general john allen today in afghanistan. he is leaving behind 100,000 u.s. troops. 33,000 of them will be brought home by september of next year. all of them by 2014. >> you have shown initiative, determination, innovativeness and courage. you have been diplomats as well as warriors, states men as well as soldiers. your performance has been, in a word, awesome. >> but just this weekend, another key aid to president harmid karzai was killed, assassinated by the taliban, just days after harmid karzai's own brother was killed by his body guard, shep. >> shepard: yet, nato is transitioning one of the key provinces to the afghan military. >> ironies of irony. the province where the taliban, back in march of 2001, brought down those huge buddha structures saying that they were
in addition of karzai's brother's assassination, it is still the same thing. >>shepard: the taliban are still, in large part, with their judicial system on wheels, and still have much in control in many places? >>guest: yes, but the taliban is shifting. they are trying to get back into power but, at the same time, the north has form add new political alliance that will never let the taliban rule so we are headed for a divisive period in politics over the next two or three years. >>shepard: what is your sense as this wraps up, what might have been accomplished? >>guest: we have shifted afghanistan toward america's values and ideas and when you go to kabul or kandahar and walk around people feel like they are part of the world and no longer buried in a draconian regime. we have done an amazing amount of good work with the infrastructure projects. but we took that country from zero to 60 in 10 years so you will see a lot, a lot, a lot of fighting and infighting, as well, much like when the russians left. people will make grabs for power in the power vacuum. so both good and bad. >>shepard: we're
in southern afghanistan. that region, of course, the birthplace of the taliban movement and the site of continued violence from insurgency. ahmed walid karzai was a pivotal figure in talks with the taliban. according to many annual polices his reported ties to heroin and opium dealers and allegations weighs on the cia payroll made him a serious liability. "the fox report's" chief correspondent jonathan hunt on the top story from the bottom of the hour from new york. it's kind of good news and bad news if a death can be good news. >> in a sense bad news because it produces some instability in a country like afghanistan. that is never good particularly in southern afghanistan where walid karzai was particularly powerful but where the taliban might try to fill the power vacuum created by his death. it also though according some analysts because wari karzai was entirely corrupt and he was tied in that corruption to the united states. so, annual listings like michael o'hanlon of the brookings institution believe it's a chance for the u.s. to create a clean slate. listen. >> it does potent
for the gains the u.s. has made in fighting the taliban and al-qaeda in afghanistan? let's bring in major general bob scales, retired united states army and fox news military analyst. there's been a lot of, i guess, confusion over this drawdown, general scales. some testimony in front of congress led by people like senator lindsey graham has made it clear that the pentagon wasn't exactly, well, onboard with the numbers that the president wants to withdraw, right? >> that's right, jon. as a matter of fact, i've spent the last week and a half around the pentagon and other places talking to active duty and retired military, and they don't talk about this campaign in terms of winning and losing, jon, they talk about it in the terms of risk. and to put a military spin on what's happening over there, as a generalule they believe that the surge has been very successful in the south in the kandahar and helmand province. but the military took risks in the northeast. that's that region between kabul and the pakistani border hoping that in 2012 they would have a very robust campaign there. well, of
insurgents and top leaders, many taliban, but several of them arabs linked to al qaeda, damaging their network. yet, the clashes reveal that al qaeda, for years, said to be mostly across the border in pakistan is again a concern back where they started in afghanistan's hills. we push down into the valley, still an insurgent stronghold. high-tech american helicopters buzzed overhead until militants shot at them up in the valley. >> uncharacteristic for the taliban around here. they are getting gutsy. past there usually patrols don't push up far past that because if you do, you're going to take enemy contact, pretty certain. >> reporter: the afghans clear about who lay and wait for them ahead. [ speaking in foreign language ] >> translator: they are talibans and arabs and poickets there. >> reporter: the foot of the valley, the american base is hit by pot shots sometimes by lone gunmen up high who they then mortar. al qaeda's return to these remote hills could tie america's hands, making it harder to justify pulling back from here. the terrorist network that made america's case for
problem is not india, it's in pakistan and the taliban and terrorist attacks about you. the pakistanis always say, no, no it's india. who you worry about, jon, whoever's fault this is, this will increase tension between india and pakistan and those are two countries who have nuclear weapons. jon: we are looking from the state ride indian television. they are reporting eight people killed. that's what our viewers are seeing on the screen. this comes on the heels of the assassination of president karzai's brother in afghanistan. any likely correction there? >> reporter: not clear. i rather doubt it, although this is a part of the world where two weeks ago we saw an attack on the intercontinental poe tell in kabul. this is a part of the world that is boiling up again, whether it's in afghanistan, pakistan, whether it's potentially in india. those three countries are all linked. the indians have ties in afghanistan. the pakistanis are worried that the indians are going to make inch roads into pakistan and afghanistan as the united states leaves the region. so, again, it's too soon to make
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)